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Web home of The Farm Journal Report.

 

If you'd like more information about the subjects covered in a show, check the list below for details about recent programs.

 

October 6: Though he's only 14 years old, Jake Riesdorf of Carmel, California, has his own beekeeping business and honey company. Riesdorf was honored by the Bayer Corporation for his work in promoting pollinators.

October 5: University of Wisconsin trials on growing tomatoes in high tunnels or hoop houses is helping to determine which tomato varieties grow best under those conditions. Advantages include a longer growing season, fewer disease problems, and higher yields overall.

October 4: Industrial hemp is making a comeback, thanks in part to efforts of folks like Brian Furnish, who raises hemp in Cynthiana, Kentucky, on land his family had grown tobacco on for generations.

October 3: A number of northern Michigan beef producers have shifted to grass feeding to take advantage of a local commitment to sourcing pasture-raised beef. They were assisted by Jason Rowntree of Michigan State University.

October 2: Tom Tracy, president and CEO of Farm Credit Illinois, thinks a lot of farmers went into the current downturn in the ag economy in a strong financial position and he suggests that has a lot to do with fewer farms than expected being in financial distress at the moment.

September 29: The Andersons, an agribusiness company based in Maumee, Ohio, gives back to the community in a number of ways.

September 28: If you rent farmland, it's good to stay in touch with your landlords and don't be afraid to tell them how things are going.

September 26-27: The Centers for Disease Control reports that even though rural Americans get cancer less often than their urban counterparts, the mortality rate from cancer is higher with rurals. The AgriSafe Network recommends regular physical exams to help diagnose problems as early as possible.

September 25: Arkansas cotton gins stay in business by updating technologies and equipment.

September 22: Former rescue dogs help with the truffle harvest in Tasmania.

September 21: Farm leaders and others offered opinions to correspondent Michelle Rook at the recent Farm Fest event in Morgan, Minnesota. Her report was included in the August 15th edition of the AgDay television program.

September 20: Google is teaming with 4-H on computer education for young folks.

September 19: Government agencies and health groups are targeting opioid abuse problems in rural America.

September 18: Farmers with stored old crop corn are facing a short window of selling opportunity before that bin space is needed for the new crop. Marketing expert Mike North of Commodity Risk Management Group (Platteville, Wisconsin) says a significant price rise is not likely for corn, unless yield forecasts are revised downward.

September 11-15: As trade officials from the United States, Canada, and Mexico continue discussing the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), correspondents with Farm Journal visited with folks on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border who have a stake in the outcome of those discussions. Here are links to expanded coverage of this week's programs: Monday   Tuesday   Wednesday   Thursday   Friday

September 8: Farmers do care about water quality and they're willing to work with their city neighbors to address water quality issues. An example is Yahara Pride Farms, a nonprofit started by local farmers to develop sustainable water solutions in the watershed surrounding Madison, Wisconsin.

September 6-7: Sara Burnett of Panera Bread says her company is very much involved in providing diners at their restaurants with "clean" food choices, and also sourcing meats that are antibiotic-free. But, she adds, that does not mean the company is opposed to all antibiotic uses in meat animal production. Burnett was part of a panel on Farm and Food Innovations at the Foodtank Summit in Boston last April.

September 5: Lindsey Shute, who operates a farm with her husband in upstate New York (she's also the executive director and co-founder of the National Young Farmers Coalition), encourages young farmers to consider livestock production--even though the enterprise is a target of animal welfare activists. Shute was part of a panel discussion on How to Make Farming More Attractive to Youth at the Foodtank Summit in Boston last April.

September 4: A Wisconsin dairy family had to sell their herd when, as a result of a Canadian import rule change, their processor cancelled their milk contract.

August 30-September 1: Rep. Jim McGovern (D., 2nd District) of Massachusetts pledges his support of continued nutrition funding in the next farm bill, as well as support for the portions of the bill that directly impact farmers and ranchers. McGovern delivered a keynote on the subject at the Foodtank Summit in Boston last April.

August 29: The University of Missouri is partnering with CoxHealth and Mercy Health Systems to build a new Patient-Centered Care Learning Center on the MU campus in Columbia, and a clinical campus facility in Springfield in an effort to keep more medical graduates working in the state--specifically, in underserved rural areas of Missouri.

August 28: The National Pork Producers Council supports the bill known as the "No Regulation Without Representation Act of 2017," which would prevent states from passing laws or regulations that would ban the sale of out-of-state products that don't meet their criteria.

August 25: Charlie Arnot, CEO of the Center for Food Integrity, says the ways people shop for their food are changing from traditional methods. Also, he says, shoppers are also placing a much greater emphasis on freshness of the food they buy.

August 24: The newly-appointed chair of the Ag Economics department at Purdue University, Jayson Lusk, says events like Amazon's recent buyout of Whole Foods send ripples all the way through the food supply chain--and those ripples have an impact on farms and ranches.

August 23: Purdue University ag economist Mike Boehlje told a group at the recent Tomorrow's Top Producer seminar that farmers need to think like CEOs. His message was to look for opportunities during times of economic stress.

August 22: U.S. sugar producers hope to maintain provisions in the federal farm policy that protect them from trade violations by foreign competitors.

August 21: The most recent quality audit of the Beef Quality Assurance program shows areas of improvement since the last audit five years ago, but also areas where more work is needed.

August 18: Farmers in Frio County, Texas, show consumers where their food comes from and how much farmers actually get from the retail food dollar.

August 17: North Dakota farmers and ranchers are cutting hay on CRP acres in drought-stricken regions of the state.

August 16: Rabobank forecasts higher demand overseas for U.S. alfalfa. Western states are expected to benefit most, since they already account for about 90% of hay exports.

August 15: The Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (Farmer MAC) and the American Bankers Association jointly surveyed ag lenders and found that about 90% of those lenders have seen declining farm profitability in the last 12 months.

August 14: Bob Utterback operates Utterback Marketing Services, a commodities brokerage firm in New Richmond, Indiana.

August 11: Batey Farms offers pick-your-own crops like strawberries, blueberries, and blackberries, as well as other produce. The farm is near Murphreesboro, Tennessee.

August 10: Ken Ferrie is an agronomist who supervises the test plots in the Farm Journal Field Test program.

August 9: The Women, Food, and Agriculture Network's mission is to engage women in building an ecological and just food and agricultural system through individual and community power.

August 8: The USDA's Farm Service Agency operates a microloan program to help young and beginning farmers. One example of how the program operates is the story of Little Wild Things City Farm in Washington, D.C.

August 7: Paul Willis of Niman Ranch says his company offers scholarships to young people to help them come back to the farm with less student loan debt.. (Willis was part of a Foodtank panel discussion on making farming more attractive to youth. Video from the panel is available here, and Willis's comments come at about 03:30 into the clip.) Niman Ranch is a producer and marketer of naturally-raised beef, pork, and lamb.

August 4: Greg Thurman is board president of the U.S. Custom Harvesters, Inc., a trade association for custom harvesters.

August 3: Chris Galen is the Senior Vice President for Communications at the National Milk Producers Federation. You can read more about the Dairy Pride Act here.

August 2: Dr. Kevin Folta chairs the Horticulture Science department at the University of Florida. The documentary film, Food Evolution, is not expected to be shown in very many traditional movie theaters but groups and individuals can arrange for showings in other venues. You can also watch a trailer for the film here.

August 1: Dr. Aaron Hager is a weed specialist in Extension with the University of Illinois.

July 31: Parts of Montana and North Dakota were recently assigned D4 status--Exceptional Drought. The United States Drought Monitor shows that area to be having the most severe drought in the entire country right now. Doug Kluck, Central Region Climate Services Director with NOAA, says the drought is expected to persist in that area.

July 28: A group of students at Kansas State University took first place in the Demonstration Project category in the Environmental Protection Agency's Rainworks Challenge in 2016. Students were asked to design innovative "green" plans for managing stormwater runoff on their campuses.

July 27: Timothy Griffin from Tufts University in Boston says converting a farm from one enterprise to another doesn't happen overnight. (Griffin was part of a Foodtank panel discussion on making farming more attractive to youth. Video from the panel is available here, and Griffin's comments come at about 26:20 into the clip.)

July 24-26: The Wildfire Relief Challenge is a collaboration between The Farm Journal Foundation, Drovers magazine, and the Howard G. Buffett Foundation to raise funds to help pay for materials and labor to restore thousands of miles of fencing lost in spring wildfires. The Buffett Foundation will match the first $1 million in donations made up through July 31.

July 21: The Kellogg Company has farmers tell their stories to help educate consumers about their food at a website called Open for Breakfast.

July 20: Matthew Dillon, Director of Agricultural Policy and Programs for the Clif Bar Company, suggests that land grant universities do more in the way of seed breeding for the benefit of local or regional production. (Dillon was part of a Foodtank panel discussion on making farming more attractive to youth. Video from the panel is available here, and Dillon's comments come at about 14:35 into the clip.)

July 19: A device called the Mighty Mite Killer raises and maintains the temperature in a beehive to the point where parasitic varroa mites infecting the bees are killed, but the bees are not harmed.

July 17-18: Consolidation may be a good thing when it comes to farm cooperatives, according to research by Dr. Keri Jacobs, professor of economics at Iowa State University.

July 14: Follow the world of farm machinery--including collectibles and antiques--at the Machinery Pete website.

July 13: Farm bankruptcy rates are not a dramatic as one might expect, based on research by economists Ani Katchova and Robert Dinterman at The Ohio State University, but they could rise.

July 12: Jim Dickrell, editor of Dairy Herd Management, offers some observations about the return on investment for various precision dairy technologies.

July 11: Minnesota has legislated a program to assist young and beginning farmers by offering tax credit incentives to landowners who rent or sell land or assets to those beginning farmers. The law takes effect in 2018.

July 10: The Spring 2017 issue of The Feed, a quarterly analysis of agriculture by Farmer Mac, includes information about the rising cost of farm labor and the shortage of workers to fill farm jobs.

July 7: The National Pork Producers Council and other farm groups are encouraging support for a farm bill provision to bolster the vaccine bank for foot and mouth disease.

July 6: Mike Steenhoek is executive director of the Soy Transportation Coalition.

July 5: The Farmers National Company provides professional farm management services to farmland owners, as well as real estate sales.

July 4: The Rural Mainstreet Index tracks the status of the rural economy in the United States. It's produced by Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska.

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